About

Case Greenfield

Artist. Philosopher. Human.

The work of Case Greenfield evolves around the idea of ‘mind models’, “the realities that we create to shape ourselves”.

As a contemporary artist and philosopher, he likes to call it postmodern realistic art. It’s all about the interplay between experience, imagination, and reality – whatever reality is, exactly.

His work, typically, explores the relations between reality and our interpretations of it: “Perception makes sense.” Mind models (something like schemata in psychology) you may call perspectives, our perspectives on reality, based on our imagination. Imagination always has an emotional touch, meaning, identity, based on hope and fear. He uses artistic expression to encourage emotional affirmation of the beholder.

With his art Case aims to bring joy from beauty, and affirmation of who we are – identity and meaning through narratives, both individually and as human beings. Attempting to reduce existential loneliness, his art helps us feel that we belong in the life that we want to live. That is what he means with ‘Warm Grounding‘.

Case asks his audience: “How purposefully do you create your daily reality?

Keywords? Reality, experience, realities, perspectives, creativity, imagination, identity, meaning, beauty, value. Turning reality into value!

Postmodern Realist

Is Case a typically postmodern artist? Well, not really. Yes, in the sense that he does see art as a useful means to escape from the limitations of reality, but …

… Case is not a typically postmodern artist, as he does believe there is something like objective reality. But he sees that it plays just a minor role in the things we, humans, feel, think and do. He tries to find a way to merge the realities, that we create to shape ourselves, into a futuristic, trans-humanistic interpretation of reality in our age of revolutionary science and disruptive technologies, hence accepting two totally new forms of limitation: (1) our growing realization of our very limited knowledge and understanding of ‘the world and (2) our non-heroic, trivial position in the evolutionary grand scheme of things (in the line of Carl Sagan’s ‘pale blue dot’).

Hence, bridging our realities of greatness and a rapidly dawning reality of our smallness, synthesizing the Humanities and the Sciences into a ‘Grand Unified Theory of (Really, haha) Everything’, which will be far from correct or complete, but one that we can live with cosily (“warm grounding”), shedding off our confusion about … well, everything.

So, sort of a “Postmodern Realist”, attempting to close the philosophical circle of modern art from Realism to Postmodernism back to an improved form of Realism … and the next winding of the helix of human culture. Attempting to merge the realist thesis and the postmodernist anti-thesis into a new synthesis, “Postmodern Realism”: a new way to deal with reality and the realities that we create. Slowly distancing from Idealism, back to a new form of Idealistic Realism, rooted in the interpretations of eg. Velasquez and Rembrandt, but based on the latest insights from modern science, eg. neuroscience, about … well, everything … into, let’s say, the next iteration of collective truth finding, Realism, while still feeling sufficiently comfortable with it, hence Postmodern Realism. Why not too fast, why must we feel comfortable with it? Because, otherwise the collective alienation (Entfremdung or Entäußerung) will lead to global chaos.

Case uses art to communicate, because life has taught him that rational arguments and logic only bring you so far, when it comes to inspiring people. Emotional incitement through visual cues and storytelling may be a more effective means to open up for new or different mind models: identity and meaning through narratives.

In the competition between fiction and truth fiction usually wins, because the truth is just too painful and too complicated – Yuval Harari

And because – as the Belgian psychologist Paul Verhaeghe said – art, literature and philosophy express what we ourselves cannot express. Das gewisse Etwas. The things that we cannot name or indicate ourselves. Those things console us, they give solace in life. As Samuel Beckett said: “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”

Artistic Philosophy and Voice

PhilosophyCase’s art expresses the messy mixture of the four realities: universal reality, scientific reality, social reality and personal reality or, more subjectively, the three realities: our daily reality (what we do), our self-created realities (our needs and desires) and a new, dawning reality (the brutal facts of the rapidly changing world around us). It basically springs off ideas of philosophers like Immanuel Kant, Bertrand Russell and esp. Ludwig Wittgenstein: instead of trying to find the limits of objectively valid knowledge (Kritik der reinen Vernuft) or trying to find the logical structure of reality in the logical structure of language (the correspondence theory from the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus) by using logic and language — based on insights from neuroscience and other sciences (eg. Antonio Damasio or Eric Kandel) on the workings of our brain, Case uses art to try to somehow merge objective ratio and subjective emotion into a consistent yet messy whole (because otherwise it is hard to bear for us: warm grounding), taking eg. the work of Wittgenstein as a source of inspiration (like eg. artists like Steve Reich and Barnett Newmann did), rather than taking philosophy as an explanation of reality. Accepting that ethical expressions – eg. about good and evil – are not objectively about reality but are a subjective condition for the realities that we create, much like Russian philosophers Leo Tolstoj and Fjodor Dostojevski did, Case prefers not to use language, but rather art to express his ideas, giving his art an almost therapeutic working.

Let art be the domain that connects reality with the realities that we create to shape ourselves

Additionally, there is a strong psychological side in ‘mental models’. Mental models easily compare with schemata in psychology: “patterns of thought or behavior that organize categories of information and the relationships among them or mental structures of preconceived ideas, frameworks representing aspects of the world, or systems in our mind of organizing and perceiving new information”. Schemata then lead to behavioral scripts: “sequences of expected behaviors for a given situation, including default standards for the actors, props, setting, and sequence of events that are normally expected to occur in a particular situation”. In his art, Case tries to express the fuzzy battle in our heads between unconscious, unplanned feelings, thoughts and behavior (Kahneman’s ‘system 1’) springing from schemata and expressed in scripts (social and personal realities) on the one hand and conscious, planned feelings, thoughts and behavior (Kahneman’s ‘system 2’) derived from universal and scientific realities on the other hand.

VoiceThe mixture of realities is expressed in his art by mixing well-thought intent and spontaneous expression in the moment of creation, and by using mixed media techniques, such as acrylic, pastel and oil paint, markers and spray, combining different color palettes, graphic and painting styles, abstract and realistic elements, different scales and more, into a varied yet consistent whole – creating artworks with both an identifiable tension and an identifiable feeling of comfort, that he likes to call “Warm Grounding“.

Case Greenfield’s art expresses the messy mixture of our daily reality, our self-created realities and a new, dawning reality.

The work of Case Greenfield evolves around the idea of ‘mind models’, “the realities that we create to shape ourselves”.

As a contemporary artist and philosopher, he likes to call it postmodern realistic art. It’s all about the interplay between experience, imagination, and reality – whatever reality is, exactly.

His work, typically, explores the relations between reality and our interpretations of it: “Perception makes sense.” Mind models (somthing like schemata in psychology) you may call perspectives, our perspectives on reality, based on our imagination. Imagination always has an emotional touch, meaning, identity, based on hope and fear. He uses artistic expression to encourage emotional affirmation of the beholder.

With his art Case aims to bring joy from beauty, and affirmation of who we are – identity and meaning through narratives, both individually and as human beings. Attempting to reduce existential loneliness, his art helps us feel that we belong in the life that we want to live. That is what he means with ‘Warm Grounding‘.

Case asks his audience: “How purposefully do you create your daily reality?

Keywords? Reality, experience, realities, perspectives, creativity, imagination, identity, meaning, beauty, value. Turning reality into value!

Postmodern Realist

Is Case a typically postmodern artist? Well, not really. Yes, in the sense that he does see art as a useful means to escape from the limitations of reality, but …

… Case is not a typically postmodern artist, as he does believe there is something like objective reality. But he sees that it plays just a minor role in the things we, humans, feel, think and do. He tries to find a way to merge the realities, that we create to shape ourselves, into a futuristic, trans-humanistic interpretation of reality in our age of revolutionary science and disruptive technologies, hence accepting two totally new forms of limitation: (1) our growing realization of our very limited knowledge and understanding of ‘the world‘ and (2) our non-heroic, trivial position in the evolutionary grand scheme of things (in the line of Carl Sagan’s ‘pale blue dot’).

Hence, bridging our realities of greatness and a rapidly dawning reality of our smallness, synthesizing the Humanities and the Sciences into a ‘Grand Unified Theory of (Really, haha) Everything’, which will be far from correct or complete, but one that we can live with cosily (“warm grounding”), shedding off our confusion about … well, everything.

So, sort of a “Postmodern Realist”, attempting to close the philosophical circle of modern art from Realism to Postmodernism back to an improved form of Realism … and the next winding of the helix of human culture. Attempting to merge the realist thesis and the postmodernist anti-thesis into a new synthesis, “Postmodern Realism”: a new way to deal with reality and the realities that we create. Slowly distancing from Idealism, back to a new form of Idealistic Realism, rooted in the interpretations of eg. Velasquez and Rembrandt, but based on the latest insights from modern science, eg. neuroscience, about … well, everything … into, let’s say, the next iteration of collective truth finding, Realism, while still feeling sufficiently comfortable with it, hence Postmodern Realism. Why not too fast, why must we feel comfortable with it? Because, otherwise the collective alienation (Entfremdung or Entäußerung) will lead to global chaos.

Case uses art to communicate, because life has taught him that rational arguments and logic only bring you so far, when it comes to inspiring people. Emotional incitement through visual cues and storytelling may be a more effective means to open up for new or different mind models: identity and meaning through narratives.

In the competition between fiction and truth fiction usually wins, because the truth is just too painful and too complicated – Yuval Harari

And because – as the Belgian psychologist Paul Verhaeghe said – art, literature and philosophy express what we ourselves cannot express. Das gewisse Etwas. The things that we cannot name or indicate ourselves. Those things console us, they give solace in life. As Samuel Beckett said: “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”

Artistic Philosophy and Voice

Philosophy – Case’s art expresses the messy mixture of the four realities: universal reality, scientific reality, social reality and personal reality or, more subjectively, the three realities: our daily reality (what we do), our self-created realities (our needs and desires) and a new, dawning reality (the brutal facts of the rapidly changing world around us). It basically springs off ideas of philosophers like Immanuel Kant, Bertrand Russell and esp. Ludwig Wittgenstein: instead of trying to find the limits of objectively valid knowledge (Kritik der reinen Vernuft) or trying to find the logical structure of reality in the logical structure of language (the correspondence theory from the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus) by using logic and language, based on insights from neuroscience and other sciences (eg. Antonio Damasio or Eric Kandel) on the workings of our brain, Case uses art to try to somehow merge objective ratio and subjective emotion into a consistent yet messy whole (because otherwise it is hard to bear for us: warm grounding), taking eg. the work of Wittgenstein as a source of inspiration (like eg. artists like Steve Reich and Barnett Newmann did), rather than taking philosophy as an explanation of reality. Accepting that ethical expressions – eg. about good and evil – are not objectively about reality but are a subjective condition for the realities that we create, much like Russian philosophers Leo Tolstoj and Fjodor Dostojevski did, Case prefers not to use language, but rather art to express his ideas, giving his art an almost therapeutic working.

Let art be the domain that connects reality with the realities that we create to shape ourselves

Additionally, there is a strong psychological side in ‘mental models’. Mental models easily compare with schemata in psychology: “patterns of thought or behavior that organize categories of information and the relationships among them or mental structures of preconceived ideas, frameworks representing aspects of the world, or systems in our mind of organizing and perceiving new information”. Schemata then lead to behavioral scripts: “sequences of expected behaviors for a given situation, including default standards for the actors, props, setting, and sequence of events that are normally expected to occur in a particular situation”. In his art, Case tries to express the fuzzy battle in our heads between unconscious, unplanned feelings, thoughts and behavior (Kahneman’s ‘system 1’) springing from schemata and expressed in scripts (social and personal realities) on the one hand and conscious, planned feelings, thoughts and behavior (Kahneman’s ‘system 2’) derived from universal and scientific realities on the other hand.

VoiceThe mixture of realities is expressed in his art by mixing well-thought intent and spontaneous expression in the moment of creation, and by using mixed media techniques, such as acrylic, pastel and oil paint, markers and spray, combining different color palettes, graphic and painting styles, abstract and realistic elements, different scales and more, into a varied yet consistent whole – creating artworks with both an identifiable tension and an identifiable feeling of comfort, that he likes to call “Warm Grounding“.

Case Greenfield’s art expresses the messy mixture of our daily reality, our self-created realities and a new, dawning reality.

Background

Work

Dutch born artist, residing in Amsterdam, NL. Case works both in his Amsterdam studio and studios in the beautiful Mediterranean south of France. He frequently travels around the world to gain inspiration for his art, especially in Shanghai and New York.

History

Trajectory

Wanting to become an artist at age 16, destiny pushed Case into a science education and business career. Finally, in 2020 at age 58, as a result of poor hearing and vision problems, Case decides to follow his passion and become an artist after all.

Background

Work

Dutch born artist, residing in Amsterdam, NL. Case works both in his Amsterdam studio and studios in the beautiful Mediterranean south of France. He frequently travels around the world to gain inspiration for his art, especially in Shanghai and New York.

History

Trajectory

Wanting to become an artist at age 16, destiny pushed Case into a science education and business career. Finally, in 2020 at age 58, as a result of poor hearing and vision problems, Case decides to follow his passion and become an artist after all.

Timeline

Artist life

Prior life

It’s in his blood …

In 1961, Kees Groeneveld is born, as the first of three sons, in Den Bosch – the city of Hieronymus Bosch – in The Netherlands, Europe. His father an R&D engineer in the Paccar (DAF) car factory, later a sales manager at Caterpillar. His mother a maternity nurse, later a house wife.

Kees ‘as a young man’ 😉 at 16 years old knows what he wants in life: to become an artist. He creates paintings and drawings, almost all of which are lost now. Yet, life took a different course. He grows up in a family and at a school where the sciences are appreciated at the cost of the humanities. But he never ceases to dream. Next to art, he develops a strong interest in philosophy. In 1979, Kees completed a 6-year classical grammar school education (gymnasium) in the Dutch city of Eindhoven. Next to humanities classes, focus and appreciation is on the sciences. Despite his nudged choice for a theoretical physics study at university, independent thinker Kees maintains a strong interest in arts and philosophy.

In 1980, Kees moves to Amsterdam and completes his theoretical physics and mathematics studies at the university in Amsterdam in 1986. In 1982 he journeys through Africa with two friends in an old army truck. Also, he is an enthusiastic mountain climber. Starting in 1987, during 22 years, until 2009, Kees works mostly as an employee at several companies in the high-tech and management consulting industries, working with many and diverse customers globally.

In 2002, his father dies of leukemia. This seizes Kees heavily, giving room for the long existing tensions in his head from not pursuing his artistic passions. In 2005 he closes this period by writing a never published novel to process the grieve about his father’s death … and about the near death of his never pursued passion. As a result of a faulty medical diagnosis by a physician, in 2009, Kees suffers of sudden deafness. After a few months his hearing magically comes back partially, but never fully recovers. A frightening experience, an existential turning point: he starts following his passions.

His sudden deafness is a game changer. Kees follows his business passion, always an independent thinker, pioneering with a creative and innovative spirit, and founds his own company, specializing in applying new technologies in organizations. As a result of his hearing problems from malfunction of his auditive cortex, in 2009 Kees starts studying neuroscience. In 2012, he founds a (not wildly successful) consulting business based on insights from neuroscience. In 2017, he founds an artificial intelligence (AI) business.

In 2020, he decides to seriously start his art practice, using the literal English translation of his Dutch name, Case Greenfield.

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